Abereiddy

We show you some of the best spots in Pembrokeshire

Abereiddy

Abereiddy

Abereiddy's sand and shingle beach with its dramatic cliffs, pretty colour-washed cottages and the striking Blue Lagoon combine to create a beautiful holiday location. This beach-side community, previously the home of quarrymen, now attracts visitors seeking a retreat from the daily "hassle" of modern life.

Abereiddy's beach is formed of a mixture of pebbles, shingle and black sand " the result of waves constantly pounding the slate cliffs.

The nearby Blue Lagoon was once a slate quarry, linked to the sea by a narrow channel. Flooded during a storm in 1904, it was closed. The Blue Lagoon serves as a reminder that the area was once prolific in the quarrying of slate. It is now considered an important geological feature.

Walking along the coast path from Abereiddy, you reach Porthgain village and harbour. Don't forget to take a look at Traeth Llwyn beach as you go along the headland.

The National Trust beach of Traethllwyn is a really beautiful, but can only be approached via the coastal path and has a flight of steps down to it.

Approaching Porthgain, north of Abereiddy, there are traces of the old narrow-gauge railway track, which once transported the quarried slate and shale to Porthgain for export.

Overlooking the beach are the ruins of a small group of cottages built for the workers of the Blue Lagoon. These were only abandoned after the floods of 1904. These in turn add "character" to this little hamlet.

Abereiddy, and in particular the lagoon, are favourites for the extreme water sport enthusiasts, who enjoys the thrill of coasteering, surfing and diving. For the non "thrill seeker", it provides a perfect location for activities such as kayaking and fishing.

Abereiddy is a favourite place for walkers and can be accessed via the spectacular Coastal Path. With a total length of 186 miles, the Pembrokeshire Coast Path is an ideal way to exploring the whole of Pembrokeshire's coastline.

For those of you who would like to enjoy the pleasures of walking without the planning, there is a coastal bus called "The Strumble Shuttle" that provides you with an easy and affordable way of returning to base.

Abereiddy beach has been awarded the Green Coast Award (similar to the Blue Flag award but for rural beaches rather than resorts).

A large car park and toilets adjoins the beach and there is also a Car Park above Traeth Llwyn beach., and in the summer months an ice cream van sells drinks as well as ices.

David Evans walked the Coastal Path and took some marvellous photographs as he did. This is the 3.5 miles between Abereiddy and Aberfelin.

Abereiddy's sand and shingle beach with dramatic cliffs, pretty colour-washed cottages and the striking Blue Lagoon combines to create the beautiful hamlet. This beach-side community, previously the home of quarrymen, now attracts visitors seeking a retreat from the hassles of modern-day life.

Aberiddy's rural beach is formed of a mixture of pebbles and black sand, the result of waves constantly pounding the slate cliffs, and nearby the famous "Blue Lagoon" can be found. The Blue Lagoon was once a slate quarry which was linked to the sea by a narrow channel; however in 1904 it was closed due to flooding during a storm. The Blue Lagoon now serves as a reminder that the area was once prolific in the quarrying of slate and it is now considered an important geological feature. Continue walking along the coast path from Abereiddy and you can reach Porthgain village and harbour, but don't forget to take a look at Traethllwyn beach as you go along the headland. Traethllwyn is a really beautiful National Trust beach, it can only be approached via the coastal path and a flight of steps down.

North of Abereiddy, approaching Porthgian there are traces of the old narrow-gauge railway track which once transported the quarried slate and shale to the harbour of Porthgain for exportation, and overlooking beach there are ruins of a small group of cottages built for the workers of the Blue Lagoon and were only abandoned after a flood in the 20th Century. These in turn contribute to the ambience of the quaint hamlet of Abereiddy.

Abereiddy, and in particular the lagoon, is a favourite for many an extreme water sport enthusiast, who enjoys the thrill of Coasteering and diving, whilst for the non-thrill seeker, it also provides a perfect location for other activities such as kayaking and fishing.

Abereiddy is also a favoured place with walkers and can be accessed via the spectacular and striking Pembrokeshire Coast Path. With a total of 186 miles, the Pembrokeshire Coast Path is an ideal solution to exploring the whole of Pembrokeshire's coast, and for those of you who would like to enjoy the pleasures of walking without the planning, there is a coastal bus called "The Strumble Shuttle" provides you with a manageable and affordable way of planning your routes.

Abereiddy beach is also awarded with the Green Coast and Seaside Award, which is a similar award to the Blue Flag award but for rural beaches, however in 2005 it was awarded the Blue flag rural beach award. A large car-park adjoins the beach, and in the summer months an ice cream van can be found where you can buy a much deserved refreshment.

Abereiddy at Low TideAbereiddy at Low Tide Picnic at AbereiddyPicnic at Abereiddy Old Sea Defences at AbereiddyOld Sea Defences at Abereiddy Coast line to west of AbereiddyCoast line to west of Abereiddy
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