Nevern

We show you some of the best spots in Pembrokeshire

Nevern

A pretty village on the banks of the river Nevern in North Pembrokeshire close to Newport.

There is a lovely circular walk through the village and an information board is situated just outside the church walls beside the mounting block. The mounting block was used by the local gentry to get on and off their horses and is one of a handful remaining.

A walk to St Brynach's Church will lead you through an avenue of 700 year old yew trees one of which is the legendary "bleeding yew" (it's the second on the right as you walk up the path) myths and legends abound for the reason the tree bleeds. The Norman church dates from the 5th Century and is open to visitors most days. The magnificent 1000 year old Celtic cross is beautifully carved stone which stands 13ft (4m) high.

Nevern was one of the stops for pilgrims on their way to St Davids Cathedral. Just above the village there is a footpath with a cross marking their way carved in relief high on a slate bank. In medieval times, the Pope declared that two pilgrimages to St. Davids equalled one to Rome.

Nevern Castle is further up the hill and is a motte and bailey earthwork. To most of us it looks like a grassy mound in the woodland, it is in fact of huge historical interest and archaeologists are digging and discovering new things all the time. It also makes a great place for a picnic on a sunny day.

You could end your visit at the riverside pub; the Trewern Arms which serves fresh cooked food, has a lovely beer garden and ample car park or if you'd like to sit in a beer garden right on the River Nevern, head some 2 miles along the main road to the Salutation Inn at Felindre. The river Nevern is known for its good fishing with Salmon, Brown Trout and the superb Sea Trout - known locally as Sewin.

Norman Bridge crossing the River NevernNorman Bridge crossing the River Nevern Fly Fishing on the Nevern RiverFly Fishing on the Nevern River
More things to do in Pembrokeshire